MBTI

If you know what the title of this post means you have probably been through some feel good, group training/team building experience.

The Meyer-Briggs indicators are used for everything from increasing productivity in teams to improving your love life. Supposedly there is no way to game the test so you get a true picture of your type.

I test out as a ENTJ.

On the positive side this translates to me being an outgoing, organized, logical, decisive big-picture kind of person. On the negative side this means that I can be perceived (not by myself of course) as arrogant, impatient and insensitive. Add in feminist and now ENTJ means Bitch.

I once had to do an MBTI exercise with a roomful of social workers and nonprofit types at a diversity workshop. [Insert any of the obvious jokes here.] The result, after the trainer sorted us physically into 4 quadrants of the room, was 27 people in the sensitive/feeling box and me, by myself in my ENTJ corner.

During the next three workshops these supposedly sensitive people called me Spock and made cracks about my drowning puppies. Clearly logical people have no feelings. Lesson learned.

Currently, I am revisiting all this “type” research in an attempt to find a way to deal with a person who appears to need more hand-holding, appreciation and affirmations than I have previously provided. I am trying to not be impatient, but I fail to see why I always have to come over to their corner.

Not only must I do the organizational grunt work “because you’re so good at that sort of thing” but then I have to make sure others feel OK with my efficiency and logic. Please.

I will figure it out and make it work because I always do, but one day I would really love to be on a team with someone else in charge of the organization and macro thinking so I can be loose, brainstorm endlessly and not have to worry about details or deadlines.

Someday.

One response to “MBTI

  1. I am an INTJ and can relate to being thought of as cold, and uncaring. I have been called “overly logical”. How is that possible?

    I was miserable in all of my office work with two exceptions: When I worked for a woman who was perceived as “less emotional” than me – hence taking the pressure off me to prove I am human and my present position in a clinical setting. I still work in an office, have a boss and do many of the same types of tasks I did in other offices. The difference is that the clinicians I work with are direct in their communication. They are responsive to my questions. They do not worry about my feelings or expect me to understand their convoluted cues meant to express theirs. When something is a problem, they tell me. When they ask my opinion the want it. It is such a relief to work among the un-emotive. I have found my niche at last.

Add to the conversation...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s